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whitepapers:narratives:ptchargeshort 2011/06/08 10:50 whitepapers:narratives:ptchargeshort 2014/07/23 16:42 current
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=====Examples of Spontaneous Use of Small White Boards===== =====Examples of Spontaneous Use of Small White Boards=====
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====Using a White Board to Clarify a Student’s Thinking [01:07:35.01] - [01:09:36.07]==== ====Using a White Board to Clarify a Student’s Thinking [01:07:35.01] - [01:09:36.07]====
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 +{{whitepapers:narratives:clarifystudentthinking.mov|Video Clip}}
The short narrative presents what had happened when Corinne had asked the class to write on their small white boards an expression for the electrostatic potential at a particular location in space due to a point charge.  She had collected a representative set of the students’ responses and then discussed these. Several times during that discussion, she spontaneously asked students to write what they were thinking on their small white boards so that she and the other students could understand better what they were trying to say.  For example, a student offered an analogy as a way to think about potentials: The short narrative presents what had happened when Corinne had asked the class to write on their small white boards an expression for the electrostatic potential at a particular location in space due to a point charge.  She had collected a representative set of the students’ responses and then discussed these. Several times during that discussion, she spontaneously asked students to write what they were thinking on their small white boards so that she and the other students could understand better what they were trying to say.  For example, a student offered an analogy as a way to think about potentials:
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By welcoming the student’s suggestion, prompting him to write out his idea on his small white board, holding up the board for the rest of the class to see, and discussing its contents, Corinne had used a student’s writing on a small white board in the midst of the discussion to help communicate the student’s thinking to the rest of the class.  Although the physics was not appropriate - his suggestion referred to forces, which could not occur with only one charge in the universe - she took care to complement the thinking - his reasoning and effort to pull relevant information from his memory.  By welcoming the student’s suggestion, prompting him to write out his idea on his small white board, holding up the board for the rest of the class to see, and discussing its contents, Corinne had used a student’s writing on a small white board in the midst of the discussion to help communicate the student’s thinking to the rest of the class.  Although the physics was not appropriate - his suggestion referred to forces, which could not occur with only one charge in the universe - she took care to complement the thinking - his reasoning and effort to pull relevant information from his memory. 
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====Example of Using a Small White Board to Clarify a Student’s Question [01:15:25.12]- [01:17:14.02]==== ====Example of Using a Small White Board to Clarify a Student’s Question [01:15:25.12]- [01:17:14.02]====
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 +{{:whitepapers:narratives:sy07092704mpt1subclip2.mov|Video Clip}}
After the class had come to agreement on an appropriate expression for the electrostatic potential due to a point charge, $V= k Q/r$, Corrine initiated a discussion about the meaning of $r$, what distance was it representing?  Speaking with hesitation expressed as a question, a student offered a more nuanced expression for the distance between the charge and the probe: After the class had come to agreement on an appropriate expression for the electrostatic potential due to a point charge, $V= k Q/r$, Corrine initiated a discussion about the meaning of $r$, what distance was it representing?  Speaking with hesitation expressed as a question, a student offered a more nuanced expression for the distance between the charge and the probe:
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Corinne put down the student’s white board and while still holding up the ball representing the charge, held up the coordinate system so all could see it. She then put both the ball and the coordinate system down together on the table. Corinne put down the student’s white board and while still holding up the ball representing the charge, held up the coordinate system so all could see it. She then put both the ball and the coordinate system down together on the table.
-Corinne: Ok. So I'm going to put this charge at the origin.  +Corinne: Ok. So I'm going to put this charge at the origin.\\\\  
-\\\\Imagine it's in the center.+Imagine it's in the center.
All right.  And then? All right.  And then?
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A student’s spontaneous and unexpected contribution prompted this interaction among the instructor and several students.  The student had used the resource of a small white board to express what she was thinking by sketching a diagram, the sketch made her thinking visually available to the instructor who leaned over to see what the student was drawing, the student was able to offer her thinking via the small white board to the instructor who then was able to convey and discuss the student’s ideas with the whole group; several members of the whole group then contributed to the conversation, and made explicit the connection between the current discussion and the activity in which the students had participated earlier in the session. A student’s spontaneous and unexpected contribution prompted this interaction among the instructor and several students.  The student had used the resource of a small white board to express what she was thinking by sketching a diagram, the sketch made her thinking visually available to the instructor who leaned over to see what the student was drawing, the student was able to offer her thinking via the small white board to the instructor who then was able to convey and discuss the student’s ideas with the whole group; several members of the whole group then contributed to the conversation, and made explicit the connection between the current discussion and the activity in which the students had participated earlier in the session.
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